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notsodarling-:

Do you ever see something someone posted, and you’re just like NO YOU ARE WRONG but you think to yourself, “This isn’t the hill I want to die on” so you have to let it go?

(via badwolfcomplex)

() 7,782 notes
hislittleflower-throughconcrete:

Even though as a child my teacher never even said tongue was an option when we trained for our first communion, I figured out that we could, and I’ve been receiving it like that ever since. It never felt right, having Him in my hands.

hislittleflower-throughconcrete:

Even though as a child my teacher never even said tongue was an option when we trained for our first communion, I figured out that we could, and I’ve been receiving it like that ever since. It never felt right, having Him in my hands.

(via badwolfcomplex)

() 52 notes
I hope you don’t have friends who recommend Ayn Rand to you. The fiction of Ayn Rand is as low as you can get re fiction. I hope you picked it up off the floor of the subway and threw it in the nearest garbage pail. She makes Mickey Spillane look like Dostoevsky.

Flannery O’Conner, as clear on her theoretical 88th birthday as on any other. (via lemkin)

Preach, Flan!

Reminds of 1 of my other favorite Flan quotes:

"Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher."

Man, I love that woman.

(via moochiethinks)

(via badwolfcomplex)

() 224 notes

actiongeek:

odditiesoflife:

The Haunting Hill of Crosses, Lithuania

Just outside the city of Šiauliai, an extremely strange sight stretches up the Lithuanian countryside - hundreds of thousands of crosses. Crosses of every shape and size, including rosaries, are crowded together in huge piles across the entire hillside. The history of the Hill of Crosses (Kryžių kalnas) is as mysterious as the place itself. No one knows exactly when the custom of leaving crosses there began, but it most likely started in 1831.

The area once housed a fort and the year 1831 marked the end of the November Uprising during which Poland sought independence from the Russian Empire. This resulted in the loss of some 40,000 men. Another rebellion, the January Uprising which lasted from 1863 to 1865, saw the loss of another 20,000. Many Lithuanian families weren’t able to retrieve the bodies of their loved ones, so they put up symbolic crosses where the former hill fort was located to honor them.

When Lithuania gained its independence from the Soviet Union in 1990, the amount of crosses grew to incredible numbers. The Hill of Crosses also gained international notoriety when Pope John Paul II visited in 1993 and prayed there.

The number of crosses left at the site continues to grow daily. Although the Hill of Crosses can appear somewhat haunting and eery, it stands as a reminder of the horrors of war and the fight for freedom across the world.

source

I know a hill in DC that could use this kind of treatment.

(via alwaysabeautifullife)

() 13,961 notes

badwolfcomplex:

the-militant-catholic:

overflowinggrace:

hero-onahistorybookpage:

JE-SUS CHRIST IS RISEN TO-DAYYY AAaAAaaAAaAAAAaaaAAAaAAAaAaAaAaALELUUUUIA

If you say you didn’t sing this in your head, you’re lying. 

OUR TRIUMPHANT HOLY DAAAAY AAaAAaaAAaAAAAaaaAAAaAAAaAaAaAaALELUUUUIA

I scrolled past this twice but now it’s stuck in my head so

() 517 notes

Prayer Request

katholikos:

Can people please pray for my grandpa? He’s in hospice with a bad infection and we’re not sure what will happen. I’m going home to see him over this Easter weekend.

(via alwaysabeautifullife)

() 119 notes

jaclcfrost:

u think i am walking around the house with a blanket around my shoulders because i cold but in actuality it is my cloak and i am on an adventure

(via lovelybitsofeverything)

() 359,048 notes